Khidja (pronounced Khadeeja) started in the 10th grade, in the backyard of their German High School. They found the name “Khidja” by stumbling upon an old record by the legendary band Mandrill, which included a track with that same name.



If you listen to “Mandrill – Khidja”, you will find yourself embarking on an adventure where genres intertwine, Latin meets prog and funk meets jazz. This fusion of styles is what Khidja is all about and over time their sound is continuously changing and transforming – jumping from era to era and genre to genre.

While collecting and absorbing music from all over the world for many years they eventually found interest in the roots of their home country. Romania was under Turkish occupation around 1500AD and the Ottoman Empire left it’s mark with a lot of it’s musical influences becoming deeply rooted in the local culture. You’ll hear it in traditional “lautareasca” music and in the omnipresent “gipsy music” too. Khidja’s sound was also inspired by this, the local Bucharest scene and the various Turkish proggy disco influences they heard a few years back when Turkish DJs like Bariș K started promoting this sound. It all went into a mix of middle-eastern electronic music with a nod towards organic sounds, synthesizers combined with cult instruments like setar, ney or saz and grungy guitars that are reminiscent of the Krautrock era.

As of 2016 they feel another urge for evolving into a new hybrid that more accurately represents their latest musical taste. Imagine all the elements that described their sound in the past, enforced by more electronics and more drums. Part of the production stays true to the middle-eastern vibe they focused on in the past and part of it explores new areas closer to house, techno, new wave and industrial.

Remixes for artists such as Psychic TV, Plus Instruments, The Rattler Proxy, Karpov Not Kasparov, Steaua de Mare and Sound Voyage are due to be released in the next months, this will give you a glimpse of what is happening in their heads right now.