Mark Ernestus is a pioneer in his own right, being regarded as one of techno and dub’s forefronts in Europe. Yet his quest for emerging sounds continues to be a surprising source of material that echoes throughout the electronic music scene, that in my opinion needs these more rooted infusions such as Ndagga Rhythm Force.

To anyone familiar with Ernestus’ recent work with Jeri-Jeri and their previous double material, ”800% Ndagga” and ”Ndagga Versions”, they would largely fit into the concept of world music in the pure sense, as sold in the Western hemisphere. Ernestus managed to gather and record a troupe of local drummers playing the sabar and the talking drum, and selected a core for his current line-up of musicians that has been storming stages throughout Europe.

In that sense, their latest album Yermande represents a detachment from its original musical roots, putting the producer’s ambitions upfront, nourished by his passion for the Senegalese sound of the mbalax.

Released in September 2016, Yermande hits the nail on the head to Western audiences, refining the brute force that the traditional music of Senegal possess in it’s complex rhythms, with a subtle yet prominent touch of electronic reveries that transcend cultural conceptions.

Through this, Mark Ernestus is doing something remarkable, his work not necessarily being appreciated by the locals from which he extracted his materials, but rather becoming something more of a hybrid that the Western world might be likely more to embrace. And with the help of his peer musicians they manage to send a message that crosses any border, fence or wall.

This is the kind of experiment that I recommend be listened to not only at home, but rather enjoyed live.

And you're in luck, because they will be one of the featured live acts at the Outernational Days 2 festival in 7-9 of July.


Tracklist:

1. Lamb Ji
2. Walo Walo
3. Simb
4. Jigeen
5. Ndiguel
6. Yermande (Kick And Bass Mix)